Tagged: Haruka Sakaguchi

The Japanese Port Town

The Japanese Port Town

Haruka Sakaguchi explores the port towns and fishing villages of her homeland, Japan.

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Holy Land, USA

Holy Land, USA

One of our swashbuckling bloggers went inside Holy Land, USA, the ghost town remains of a Connecticut theme park which closed its doors in 1984. 

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Volcanoes National Park, Hawai’i

Volcanoes National Park, Hawai’i

Hawai’i conjures up images of beach chairs and palm trees; lesser known is that it is one of most topographically diverse archipelagos on the planet. The Big Island houses two active volcanoes and a volcanic landscape so riveting that early settlers deemed it the resting place of Pele, the goddess of fire.

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City Island, Bronx

City Island, Bronx

Hanging precariously off the eastern coast of the Bronx is the sleepy fishing village of City Island. Though it is only an hour and a half away from the steely stare of Manhattan, it feels like a slice of idyllic New England.

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Winter in Montauk

Winter in Montauk

Winter in Montauk is a rugged beach town diorama, a smattering of boxy dwellings and plywood scraps on a pristine beach. The numerous surf shops are boarded up until summer; locals gather instead at the Shagwong Restaurant, where the beer flows freely and the radiator thaws the cold right out of your flushed cheeks. Often […]

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Takachiho Gorge, Japan

Takachiho Gorge, Japan

Sei-jyaku is a quintessentially Japanese sentiment connoting poignant silence. Neither positive nor negative, it signifies willful inaction, a deeply restorative and brimming silence that is as life-giving as it is all-consuming and melancholic. It is what one feels when locking eyes with a stranger, when staring up at the surface while drifting underwater. It is […]

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Homes in the Badlands

Homes in the Badlands

Far beyond the desert chic glamor of Palm Springs stretches miles upon miles of “uninhabitable” desert. Summer temperatures reach a blistering 120F while nighttime temperatures dip down to a bone-chilling 40F. The clay-based soil yields little more than arbitrary dust storms and the occasional sagebrush. Here, the roads come to an end and the sun […]

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Chinatown, New York City

Chinatown, New York City

Chinatown is a city in itself. A tidal restlessness permeates the neighborhood, as does the distinct aroma of fresh fish and damp cigarettes. People move quickly here, but not in the tight, choreographed shuffle of the typical Midtowner — it involves more ducking and turning, a lot more cursing and tripping over small children and […]

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Lessons Learned in Slab City, CA

Lessons Learned in Slab City, CA

Nearly 200 miles east of Los Angeles in California’s Badlands lies a tight-knit squatter settlement known as Slab City. A smattering of festively painted RVs dot the parched land amongst concrete slabs from abandoned WWII marine barracks. Residents — also known as “slabbers” — endure 120°F summers with little more than shady tents and macgyvered […]

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